A look at the people, places, and conspiracies of Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code

Pablo Picasso

Posted by on Mar 29, 2012 in Art & Artists of The Da Vinci Code, Featured | 0 comments

Pablo Picasso

Perhaps the most conspicuous figure in 20th Century Art was Pablo Picasso. The sheer volume of work he generated during his lifetime was astonishing. Picasso´s interests were as diverse as his art; dabbling in painting, drawing, lithographs, ceramics, sculptures, graphic art, and stage set design. He braved new worlds almost daily with his unique subject matter, forms, techniques, and his unconventional use of new media. A modern art genius, Picasso´s innovative techniques sent shockwaves through the art world that still reverberate today.

Picasso possessed a natural gift, but he was not without professional training. In 1897 when he was sixteen, his father sent Picasso to the Royal Academy in Madrid. Although this was the dream of most young artists, Picasso found himself disappointed in his instructors and longing for more substantial training. He finally gave up his studies in June of 1898 and went his own way.

 

Les Demoiselles D'Avignon by Pablo Picasso

Les Demoiselles D'Avignon by Pablo Picasso


The era that followed from 1901 – 1906, is referred to as his Blue & Rose Period for obvious reasons. His work was steeped in color and emphasized form, rather than representational imagery. Picasso was the epitome of show, not tell.

 

Picasso turned to artists of the past to become his instructors. He studied Toulouse-Lautrec, Van Gogh, Pissarro, Degas, Gauguin, Delacroix, Manet, and Monet. Never a copycat, Picasso incorporated elements from each of these artists and found his own voice within his work. Tens of thousands of pieces of Picasso´s art survive, and chronicle his explorations.

 

A word commonly associated with Picasso´s work is defamiliarization. He took common artistic representations and used color and form to manipulate them to create intense abstractions and contrasts. This style was most apparent in his Cubism Period from 1906 – 1915. Demoiselles dèAvignon is considered one of the most important works in Modern Art. Picasso created it after he completed a long series of studies, 809 to be exact, and it took him nine months to complete the final painting. Demoiselles dèAvignon defied conventional style by placing of his subjects in three separate zones where their bodies can be seen from both front and side at the same time. With this painting Picasso ushered in a new era where pure form ruled.

 

Guernica by Pablo Picasso

Guernica by Pablo Picasso


 

 

Another milestone was the creation of Guernica: Testimony of War. This mural is perhaps the most powerful antiwar statement made in the modern art world. In it Picasso reverted back to primitive forms to depict the destruction and terror caused by war. Guernica was Picasso´s outraged protest of Franco´s massacre of 1600 people who lived in Guernica, Spain and his attempt to warn the world of the upcoming Fascist threat. The painting was sent to the World´s Fair in Paris during 1937, where it was received with criticism, and then it toured the world.

 

As with most symbolism, it must be viewed with an eye towards the time in which it was created, and with consideration of what the symbol meant to the artist. This is something that becomes more and more difficult over time. How do we mentally place ourselves into the Renaissance to properly assess Leonardo´s work? In Guernica, Picasso uses the image of a bull, as he does in many of his works. What does the bull represent? It could represent Spain, Spanish culture, the aggressor, or even Picasso himself in some ways. When Picasso was asked to explain the symbolism in Guernica, he responded:

“It isn’t up to the painter to define the symbols. Otherwise it would be better if he wrote them out in so many words! The public who looks at the picture must interpret the symbols as they understand them.”

– Picasso (as quoted in Treasures of the World, PBS)

This means that the symbolism that an artist creates in one of his painting may take on a completely separate meaning as time passes, one which the artist had no part in during its creation. It all depends on the interpretation of the viewer.

Picasso continued to create at a frantic pace to the end of his life. From age 87 to age 91 he created more than 500 etchings, 350 paintings, and 260 drawings! Over the course of his life, he created more than 20,000 works of art. He died at the age of 92 in his villa near Mougins, France.

 

Citation styles

APA style
Pablo Picasso. (2013, October 13). In Inside The Da Vinci Code. Retrieved 18:13, November 24, 2017, from http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/pablo-picasso/
MLA style
classbrain, “Pablo Picasso.” Inside The Da Vinci Code. 13 October 2013, 04:49 UTC. . 24 Nov 2017 <http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/pablo-picasso/>.
MHRA style
classbrain, 'Pablo Picasso', Inside The Da Vinci Code, 13 October 2013, 04:49 UTC, <http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/pablo-picasso/> [accessed 24 November 2017]
The Chicago Manual of Style
classbrain, “Pablo Picasso.” Inside The Da Vinci Code, http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/pablo-picasso/ [accessed November 24, 2017].
CBE/CSE style
classbrain, Pablo Picasso [Internet]. Inside The Da Vinci Code; 2013 October 13, 04:49 UTC [cited 2017 Nov 24]. Available from: http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/pablo-picasso/.
Bluebook style
Pablo Picasso, http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/pablo-picasso/ (last visited Nov. 24, 2017).
AMA style
classbrain, Pablo Picasso. Inside The Da Vinci Code. October 13, 2013, 04:49 UTC. Available at: http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/pablo-picasso/. Accessed November 24, 2017.

Citation styles

APA style
Pablo Picasso. (2013, October 13). In Inside The Da Vinci Code. Retrieved 18:13, November 24, 2017, from http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/pablo-picasso/
MLA style
classbrain, “Pablo Picasso.” Inside The Da Vinci Code. 13 October 2013, 04:49 UTC. . 24 Nov 2017 <http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/pablo-picasso/>.
MHRA style
classbrain, 'Pablo Picasso', Inside The Da Vinci Code, 13 October 2013, 04:49 UTC, <http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/pablo-picasso/> [accessed 24 November 2017]
The Chicago Manual of Style
classbrain, “Pablo Picasso.” Inside The Da Vinci Code, http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/pablo-picasso/ [accessed November 24, 2017].
CBE/CSE style
classbrain, Pablo Picasso [Internet]. Inside The Da Vinci Code; 2013 October 13, 04:49 UTC [cited 2017 Nov 24]. Available from: http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/pablo-picasso/.
Bluebook style
Pablo Picasso, http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/pablo-picasso/ (last visited Nov. 24, 2017).
AMA style
classbrain, Pablo Picasso. Inside The Da Vinci Code. October 13, 2013, 04:49 UTC. Available at: http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/pablo-picasso/. Accessed November 24, 2017.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Site last updated October 30, 2013 @ 8:58 am; This content last updated October 13, 2013 @ 4:47 am