A look at the people, places, and conspiracies of Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code

Georgia O’Keeffe

Posted by on Mar 29, 2012 in Art & Artists of The Da Vinci Code | 0 comments

Georgia O’Keeffe

One of the first artists to experiment with abstract form was Georgia Totto O´Keeffe (1887-1986). She had several different personas, however, which sometimes obscured her massive achievements as an artist. What remains clear is the fact that throughout her 80-year career, visionary use of abstraction was O´Keeffe´s her hallmark. The majority of her oeuvre consisted of a representation of her reaction to the inner beauty of nature. Her explorations as both a woman and an artist in early 20th century America was extremely important to the world of art.

Georgia O´Keeffe was gaining notoriety before the start of her relationship with Alfred Stieglitz, a prominent American photographer and dealer. Her reputation solidified with his help between 1916 and 1940, however, as the result of Stieglitz´ exhibition of her work as a representation of the female consciousness. Stieglitz is often referred to as the father of modern photography for his efforts in establishing it as an art form. He was deeply influenced by Sigmund Freud´s popular theories of the day, which examined infantile sexuality and dreams, as well as the concept of the id, ego, and superego.

In 1921 an exhibition of Stieglitz´ sexual, photographic portraits of O´Keeffe, along with O´Keeffe´s own work that dramatically depicted flowers from the inside out, forever labeled her as a sensualist female. Although she might have disagreed with Stieglitz´ modus operandi, it helped to land her at the forefront of American Art by 1929. She was the only woman whose work was represented at the Museum of Modern Art´s Paintings by 19 Living Americans that same year.

During the 1930s and 1940s, O´Keeffe regained control of her image and marketing strategies, due to Alfred Stieglitz´ declining health and subsequent death in 1946. She began to repurchase her work during this time, and by the time she died in 1986, she owned over 1100 of the more than 2000 pieces she had originally created.

Georgia O'Keeffe - <em>Jack-in-the-Pulpit No. IV</em>, 1930 - Alfred Stieglitz Collection, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.

Georgia O'Keeffe - <em>Jack-in-the-Pulpit No. IV</em>, 1930 - Alfred Stieglitz Collection, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.


She permanently moved to New Mexico in 1946, after having spent many summers in the state painting her surroundings and clearing her brain. Her work at this stage represented her deep appreciation for the vastness of the open plains and for the quality of the light. She used both realism and abstraction to portray her various emotional states.

In the 1950s and 60s, O´Keeffe allowed photos to be taken of her on her property. This public relations campaign created a quieter and softer public image of Georgia, and it began to supplant the more controversial image Stieglitz had established for her at the beginning of her career.

Towards the end of her life she began losing her eyesight. She stopped painting completely by the beginning of the 1970s. A young potter, named Juan Hamilton became her companion in these last years, and his influence gave her a medium to explore that did not need her eyes as much as her sense of touch. She died in Santa Fe in 1986, at the age of 98.

Georgia O´Keeffe was strong and independent. An inner light appeared to shine from the center of all her works. Just as she had a tendency to produce art in series form, her life produced a succession of visionary pinnacles. The evolution of her craft was similar to the ebb and flow of the earth that she was so very fond of and which is so clearly reflected through the tales told in her paintings and other artwork.

Citation styles

APA style
Georgia O’Keeffe. (2012, March 29). In Inside The Da Vinci Code. Retrieved 00:27, July 25, 2014, from http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/georgia-okeeffe/
MLA style
classbrain, “Georgia O’Keeffe.” Inside The Da Vinci Code. 29 March 2012, 18:37 UTC. . 25 Jul 2014 <http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/georgia-okeeffe/>.
MHRA style
classbrain, 'Georgia O’Keeffe', Inside The Da Vinci Code, 29 March 2012, 18:37 UTC, <http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/georgia-okeeffe/> [accessed 25 July 2014]
The Chicago Manual of Style
classbrain, “Georgia O’Keeffe.” Inside The Da Vinci Code, http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/georgia-okeeffe/ [accessed July 25, 2014].
CBE/CSE style
classbrain, Georgia O’Keeffe [Internet]. Inside The Da Vinci Code; 2012 March 29, 18:37 UTC [cited 2014 Jul 25]. Available from: http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/georgia-okeeffe/.
Bluebook style
Georgia O’Keeffe, http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/georgia-okeeffe/ (last visited Jul. 25, 2014).
AMA style
classbrain, Georgia O’Keeffe. Inside The Da Vinci Code. March 29, 2012, 18:37 UTC. Available at: http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/georgia-okeeffe/. Accessed July 25, 2014.

Citation styles

APA style
Georgia O’Keeffe. (2012, March 29). In Inside The Da Vinci Code. Retrieved 00:27, July 25, 2014, from http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/georgia-okeeffe/
MLA style
classbrain, “Georgia O’Keeffe.” Inside The Da Vinci Code. 29 March 2012, 18:37 UTC. . 25 Jul 2014 <http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/georgia-okeeffe/>.
MHRA style
classbrain, 'Georgia O’Keeffe', Inside The Da Vinci Code, 29 March 2012, 18:37 UTC, <http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/georgia-okeeffe/> [accessed 25 July 2014]
The Chicago Manual of Style
classbrain, “Georgia O’Keeffe.” Inside The Da Vinci Code, http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/georgia-okeeffe/ [accessed July 25, 2014].
CBE/CSE style
classbrain, Georgia O’Keeffe [Internet]. Inside The Da Vinci Code; 2012 March 29, 18:37 UTC [cited 2014 Jul 25]. Available from: http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/georgia-okeeffe/.
Bluebook style
Georgia O’Keeffe, http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/georgia-okeeffe/ (last visited Jul. 25, 2014).
AMA style
classbrain, Georgia O’Keeffe. Inside The Da Vinci Code. March 29, 2012, 18:37 UTC. Available at: http://www.insidethedavincicode.com/georgia-okeeffe/. Accessed July 25, 2014.

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